Tokyo transportation and subway museums 東京の交通博物館

Originally posted on the tokyo files archives 東京ファイル:
People often reach my blog with the search terms “Tokyo Transportation Museum”, “Tokyo Subway Museum”, or “Tokyo Train Museum”. Fair enough. Let me tell you what I know. There are several museums in the Tokyo area related to trains, subways, and transportation. The ones I know are: (1) Tobu Museum of…

Monorails and more: Tokyo’s amusing train lines

There are 158 rail lines in Tokyo. That’s a staggering number. Instead of describing all 158 lines, let me tell you about the 18 most interesting. These include monorails, streetcars, people movers, and more. And a glass-bottomed train! The numbered list below corresponds to the following map: I. Monorails (1) Chiba Urban Monorail 千葉都市モノレール The Chiba Urban Monorail…

Walking on water: the underground rivers of Tokyo 東京の地下河川や運河の地図

Underground rivers and streams course below the surface of Tokyo, making fascinating walking paths all across the city. The Tokyo Files is mapping pedestrian paths and “green roads” that follow the route of old rivers and streams. This is a travel guide to Tokyo’s rivers of the past.

Danchi train stations in Japan 日本では「団地」駅

Two of my Japanese obsessions are a match made in urban planning heaven: 1) Japan’s vast passenger rail network, and 2) danchi 団地, the large housing complexes that became popular in post-WWII Japan. (I even started a separate blog:the tokyo files: danchi 東京団地萌え). Danchi are characterized by uniform rows of unremarkable building that are sequentially numbered so that…

Planting rice on the highway: Ohashi Green Junction

This is what happens when you combine a building and a highway: Or this: But it doesn’t have to be this way. Consider the Gate Tower Building ゲートタワービル in Osaka 大阪 , also known as The Beehive「ビーハイブ」/「蜂の巣」 (Google maps). The Gate Tower building is an efficient use of dense urban space, and presumably was the result of a great deal of…

Visit beautiful Kawasaki! (You can’t get there from here!) かわいい川崎に行こう

Kawasaki-ku 川崎区 is not known for tourism. Ask Wikipedia and you’ll find that the city has been known for “grime, labor unrest, organized crime and pollution-related diseases.” So it’s a surprise to me (and my coworkers) that I so often find myself in Kawasaki. I. The world’s shortest escalator On three occasions I’ve visited the world’s shortest escalator, located…